Friday 14th December

Advertise | Login  RSS  |  Twitter  |  Facebook

IMG_2253

Playboy Club London’s Gothic Gin Garden Pop Up

By Samm Abbott

Playboy Club London has transformed into a unique fairy-tale style ‘Gothic Garden’ for this November, when it plays host to its first Tanqueray Gin pop-up. 

The Gothic Garden opened on 27th October and will run until the 24th November.  It is simply a stunning venue, decked with ethereal ferns, roses and greenery to showcase an intriguing yet comfortable environment to make your gin dreams come true.

IMG_2293Customers will be able to relax with specially crafted gin cocktails, before enjoying the ultimate personalised gin inspired experience.  There are two experiences on offer, the ‘gin & on it’ or the ‘ginfusion’.

The ‘gin & on it’ experience allows you a personalised tailored session with the Playboy Club London’s bartender who will talk you through the interactive botanical gin garden.  This will allow you to create your own bespoke gin cocktail.

Customers opting for the full ‘ginfusion’ experience will not only receive a glass of gin punch on arrival but will soon be visited by the ‘gin fusion’ trolley.  Here you will have a go at pressure infusing your favourite botanicals with Tanqueray gin to create your very own, custom-made G&T.  You’ll also take away a 300ml measure of your ‘ginfusion’ in a bottle with bespoke label, to enjoy at home.

This was a fun and unique way to enjoy Tanqueray Gin and for only £33, extremely good value!  Here at What’s On London, we absolutely loved this experience and haven’t stopped talking about.

Advance tickets for a table reservation, can be purchased for either £10.00 or £33.00 per head.  For tickets, visit www.playboyclublondon.com.

Category: Hidden London
DY4cHc9UQAA14zR

Jordan Brookes: Bleed review

Rating:

Ian Cater, Chief Features Writer & Reviewer

Brookes’ new version of Bleed fails to match the Edinburgh iteration, but remains compelling viewing.  

The self-styled “riskiest comic in the biz” has landed at Soho Theatre with a typically arresting show that relies on unsettling honesty and bold sensory tricks to give its creator the laughs he craves.

Bleed, Brookes’ fourth hour-long show, was unfortunate not to be nominated for the main prize at the Fringe, where it stood out in both style and substance.  For the former, Brookes took the punchy decision to use a quirk of the venue – the Pleasance Courtyard’s hustle and bustle – as a pretence for employing technology to extend his efforts to assault the audience’s senses.  Here, in the calmer confines of a darkened performance space, Brookes has had to tweak that conceit to achieve similar results, albeit a little more telegraphed and a little less edgy in its execution.

Continue reading »

Category: Comedy
EdinburghFringeProgramme2018

The Edinburgh Fringe: Ten To See

With just over one week left of the world’s greatest arts festival, Ian Cater lists his top ten comedy shows to see if you’re lucky enough to be north of the border before the Edinburgh Fringe comes to a close on 27th August.  And if you can’t make it up there, continue to follow What’s On London on Facebook and Twitter for news of when these fantastic shows are heading here. 

gs_gary_starr_micf18Garry Starr Performs Everything (right).  Occasionally a show has people almost soiling themselves with laughter from start to finish and this spoof whirlwind theatre lesson is one such daft, chaotic and immensely talented production.  Damien Warren-Smith’s actor-who-knows-best rattles through every theatrical form in various states of undress in a manner that’s equal parts hilarious and unpredictable.  Every day from 20.10 at Underbelly Cowgate, with an extra show at 22.50 on 21st August (tickets here).

Continue reading »

Category: Comedy
malmaison-london

Chez Mal, EC1M: restaurant review

Ian Cater, Chief Features Writer & Reviewer

Heading below ground to escape a bustling Clerkenwell simmering from one of the hottest days of one of the hottest years felt like blessed relief.  Darkly lit apart from some mildly jarring neon pop art motifs and empty other than a pair of early evening diners, Malmaison’s Chez Mal restaurant was only an ample air conditioning unit short of Shangri-la.

The contemporary New York-style dining room – as with many spaces that day – was a touch too warm to hinder hidrosis and so, disappointingly, was the #nochill Mamaku Sauvignon Blanc.  Fortunately, that warmth spread elsewhere, to the service of our host Emanuele and to the collective culinary cogs – mostly residing in the noggin of executive chef John Woodward – that whirred in preparing such a balanced and sumptuous summer menu.

Continue reading »

Category: Restaurants
DjRJpU4WwAAdS4o.jpg-large

Rob Oldham: Worm’s Lament review

Rating:

Ian Cater, Chief Features Writer & Reviewer

Rob Oldham makes a solid start in his first hour-long show, showing a sharp eye for observational comedy.

For a first hour-long Edinburgh show, this is an assured effort from Rob Oldham.  Although never quite hitting the heights you suspect he may be capable of in time, he delivers a well-structured show – frequently commentated on during fourth wall-breaking moments – that’s heavy on parody and neat one-liners.

Continue reading »

Category: Comedy
Screen Shot 2018-07-27 at 15.14.32

Wil Greenway: Either Side of Everything review

Rating:

Ian Cater, Chief Features Writer & Reviewer

Wil Greenway delivers more warm and engaging storytelling, but loses something in this style experiment. 

Over the past few years, a Wil Greenway show has virtually guaranteed a charming, poetic experience filled with passion and laughter.  This year’s iteration, Either Side of Everything, is ultimately no exception but something seems to have been lost in the Australian’s experiment towards comedy and multiple storylines.

Continue reading »

Category: Comedy
Dj66QfBWwAAeNB8.jpg-large

Chris Kent: Looking Up, Edinburgh review

Rating:

Ian Cater, Chief Features Writer & Reviewer

Chris Kent proves himself to be a witty and adept storyteller, but lacks punchlines needed for the next level.

Cork-born comedian Chris Kent is James Acaster’s favourite stand-up and – for swathes of this show – you can see why.  His style isn’t dissimilar, injecting run-of-the-mill stories with a measure of absurdity by fixating on funny phrases (like “booty cover” and “sweat pea”) and heightening their impact by telling them behind an emotionless mask.  But where he falls short of his biggest fan – in this show at least – is in creating tension (without which, there’s nothing to cut through), producing punchlines and hanging his tales onto an overarching narrative framework.

Continue reading »

Category: Comedy
sheeps

Sheeps: Live and Loud Selfie Sex Harry Potter review

Rating:

Ian Cater, Chief Features Writer & Reviewer

Despite the performers’ pedigree, Sheeps’ return to sketch comedy doesn’t quite match the sum of its parts.

Sheeps, as they announce after an enjoyable opening number, haven’t performed together in four years and this show is heralded as their triumphant return.  In the interim, Liam Williams has had fingers in pretty much every creative pie going (Ladhood, Pls Like, Capital), Alastair Roberts has made a name for himself as an accomplished comic actor (recently seen excelling in Stath Lets Flats) and Daran Johnson has showcased his writing talents on sitcoms like Year Friends.  In short, the three possess bucket loads of talent, but don’t manage to mop up as much laughter as they should in this format.

Continue reading »

Category: Comedy