Sunday 20th August

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Alfie Venner Woodcock

Face to Face

Voices from the Edge – a Festival of Solo Theatre

Rating:

The third Face to Face Festival of Solo Theatre “Voices from the Edge” is coming to LOST Theatre, featuring 45 solo performances over six evenings this October. Last night was the festival’s launch; six varied and enticing exerts from six talented performers, which had the audience eagerly participating from the start. Covering topics from baking and cheer leading through to the imperfect and the Doctor himself, both the content and the tone of the performances promises to be richly varied.

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Category: Theatre
temple church london

Romeo and Juliet, Performed in the Ancient Temple Church

Rating:

Temple Church’s looming pillars form the corners of the stage, while dim light outside illuminates the stain-glass windows. In the shadows cast by the venue’s substantial architecture, Antic Disposition’s cast nimbly circumnavigates the audience to appear on stage. The actors emerge from the shadows into Tom Boucher’s blood red floodlights, establishing the intent to make the tragedy tangible from the word go.

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Category: Theatre

Grim – A New Musical at The Charing Cross Theatre

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As dry ice fills the air and an eerie blue light illuminates the stage, the gothic intentions of Untold Theatre’s new musical are set out from the off. The show starts strongly with numbers Cupids Soliloquy and The Only Certainty in Life is Death, the refrain of the latter impressively belted out by the enthusiastic cast. However, while this chorus stays with us after the show, the other songs have unmemorable melodies and ordinary lyrics.

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Category: Music
Simon Bailey and Laura Pitt-Pulford in MARRY ME A LITTLE at St James Studio. PHOTO CREDIT Roy Tan (4)
Simon Bailey and Laura Pitt-Pulford in MARRY ME A LITTLE at St James Studio. PHOTO CREDIT Roy Tan

Marry Me a Little by Stephen Sondheim

Rating:

The breathtaking Laura Pitt-Pulford and charisma-laden Simon Bailey portray the inner workings of two New York singles; living tragically close to each other, but destined to be alone.

Hannah Chissick’s intimate production proves once more that even the widely acknowledged master of contemporary musical theatre, Stephen Sondheim, is not always right about the merits of theatrical endeavour. When concept writer Craig Lucas sent Sondheim a postcard asking to create a production from his large collection of cut and unpublished songs, the Don of showbiz agreed, adding that it was a ‘terrible idea’. Marry Me a Little went on to enjoy a sell out first season.

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Category: Theatre
Jason Durr as Poirot
Jason Durr as Poirot

Hercule Poirot in Black Coffee at Fairfield Halls

A stimulating exhibition of detective cunning saw the marvelous Hercule Poirot return to the London Stage. Following David Suchet’s retirement from the televised version in 2013, after nearly 25 years on the job, the mammoth task of filling the detective’s smart brogues falls to Jason Durr; best known for his portrayal of Mike Bradley in the police drama Heartbeat.

A performance that upheld this rich theatrical tradition and charmed Tuesday’s audience came from Jason Durr’s fantastically expressive eyebrows. When employed along with pensively joined fingertips and a neater than neat three piece suit that looked as if it were drawn with a ruler, the charismatic little Belgian was brought to life with more than a little joie de vivre.

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Category: Uncategorized
THE SILVER TASSIE

The Silver Tassie Review at the National Theatre

In The Silver Tassie, the transition from Realism to Expressionism is seamlessly achieved through the marvellous mechanics of the National Theatre stage. Before our eyes the run-down, though relatively peaceful Dublin house disappears to be replaced by the war-ravished ruin of a French Town, low lit and thick with smoke as sudden explosions overhead momentarily illuminate the scene. The stage is so deep that the soldiers, who slowly approach the audience, are at first only just visible as ominous silhouettes looming through the smoke.

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Category: Theatre
attachment-2

A Handful of Stars Review at Theatre 503

Theatre 503 transported Saturday’s audience from a crisp spring evening in South London to a run-down snooker hall in Wexford Town, sometime in the late 1980s. The play centres on teenager Jimmy Brady (Ciarán Owens), a ‘chancer’ who is constantly in and out of trouble both with his girlfriend Linda (Maureen O’Connell) and with the police. While pop-star Keith Duffy impresses on his UK stage debut, Owens holds his own with an enjoyable mix of teenaged angst, cock-sure swagger and social rebellion.

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Category: Culture
Keeler by Gill Adams
Keeler by Gill Adams at Charing Cross Theatre

Review of Keeler at Charing Cross Theatre

Sex, scandal and sixties: Three words that couldn’t possibly fail to excite Wednesday’s audience at the Charing Cross Theatre… or could they?

The panels at the back of the stage slide open to reveal a single black Julian Bowen chair with its back facing the audience. Our imaginations fill in the rest of the iconic scene as the voice of Christine Keeler (Sarah Armstrong) comes loud and clear through the speakers. The first scene empties the chair of its perceived object and fills the auditorium with the subject’s voice, promising to finally tell her side of the story.

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Category: Uncategorized